• JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
 
  Bookmark and Share
 
 
Doctoral Thesis
DOI
10.11606/T.74.2007.tde-04092007-083154
Document
Author
Full name
Gustavo Ribeiro Del Claro
E-mail
Institute/School/College
Knowledge Area
Date of Defense
Published
Pirassununga, 2007
Supervisor
Committee
Zanetti, Marcus Antônio (President)
Brisola, Marcelo Landim
Melo, Mariza Pires de
Miyasaka, Célio Kenji
Rennó, Francisco Palma
Title in Portuguese
Influência da suplementação de cobre e selênio no metabolismo de lipídeos em bovinos
Keywords in Portuguese
Ácidos graxos
Colesterol
Minerais
Abstract in Portuguese
Vinte e oito bovinos Brangus foram usados para se determinar o efeito da suplementação de cobre e selênio no desempenho, características de carcaça, composição de ácidos graxos no músculo Longissimus dorsi (LD) e na concentração de colesterol sérico e no músculo LD . Os tratamentos foram : 1) C(Controle) - sem a suplementação de cobre e selênio; 2) Se - 2 mg Se/kg de matéria seca na forma de selenito de sódio; 3) Cu- 40 mg Cu/kg de matéria seca na forma de sulfato de cobre; 4) Se/Cu- 2 mg Se/kg de matéria seca na forma de selenito de sódio e 40 mg Cu/kg de matéria seca na forma de sulfato de cobre. O ganho de peso diário aumentou com a suplementação de selênio (P<0,05). A eficiência alimentar foi melhor (P<0,05) nos tratamentos selênio, cobre e selênio/cobre, em relação ao controle. A ingestão de matéria seca não foi alterada pelos tratamentos (P>0,05). A espessura de gordura e composição de ácidos graxos do músculo LD não foram influenciados pelos tratamentos (P>0,05). A concentração sérica de colesterol não foi influenciada pelos tratamentos (P>0,05), entretanto, a concentração de colesterol no LD foi menor nos bovinos suplementados com cobre e selênio (P < 0.05). A glutationa peroxidase e GSSG aumentaram (P<0,05) com a suplementação de cobre , selênio ou selênio/cobre (P <0,05).
Title in English
Influence of copper and selenium supplementation on lipid metabolism in cattle
Keywords in English
Cholesterol
Fatty acid
Mineral
Abstract in English
Twenty eight Brangus steers were used to determine the effects of copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) supplementation on performance, carcass characteristics, Longissimus dorsi muscle fatty acid composition and serum and Longissimus dorsi muscle cholesterol concentrations. Treatments were: 1) control - no supplemental Cu and Se; 2) Se - 2 mg Se/kg DM as sodium selenite; 3) Cu - 40 mg Cu/kg DM as copper sulfate; 4) Se/Cu - 2 mg Se/kg DM as sodium selenite and 40 mg Cu/kg DM as copper sulfate. Daily weight gain increased with selenium supplementation (P<0,05). Feed efficiency was better in selenium, copper and selenium/copper treatments than in the control group. Dry matter intake was not affected by treatments (P>0.05). Backfat and Longissimus dorsi fatty acid concentrations were not affected by treatments (P > 0.05). Serum cholesterol concentration was not affected by treatments (P>0.05), however, Longissimus dorsi cholesterol concentrations were lower in steers supplemented with Cu and Se (P<0.05). GSSG and GSH Px increased (P<0.05) with Cu, Se and Se/Cu supplementation.
 
WARNING - Viewing this document is conditioned on your acceptance of the following terms of use:
This document is only for private use for research and teaching activities. Reproduction for commercial use is forbidden. This rights cover the whole data about this document as well as its contents. Any uses or copies of this document in whole or in part must include the author's name.
2344630DO.pdf (341.64 Kbytes)
Publishing Date
2007-09-04
 
WARNING: Learn what derived works are clicking here.
All rights of the thesis/dissertation are from the authors
Centro de Informática de São Carlos
Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations of USP. Copyright © 2001-2020. All rights reserved.